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The Sweet Word ‘Come’

The first use of the word “come” in the Bible is a “Come” of Salvation, when God invited Noah and his

family into the ark. The last use of the word in the Bible is also a “Come” of Salvation―“The Spirit and the

Bride say, Come.” After John had seen all the glories of heaven, the Lord Jesus Christ sent him the message,

“Come”―the last message Jesus sent from heaven to this earth.

Luke tells the delightful Sunday School children’s story of a ‘wee little man’ named Zaccheus, who had

climbed up a tree to see Jesus as He passed by. Jesus, when he saw him, said, “Make haste and come down, for

today I must abide at thy house.” People said Zaccheus was very much in earnest, but if he were, he would have

been like the woman with the issue of blood who pressed through the crowd to touch Jesus instead of hiding

himself up in a tree. We do not read that Zaccheus saw Jesus, but Jesus saw Zaccheus. We are naturally proud,

and, like Zaccheus, we wish to exalt ourselves; but before Jesus can do us any good, we must come down.

Our Lord Jesus said, “Come unto Me, all ye that labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.”

This is a very important invitation to “come;” there must be a coming unto the person of the Lord Jesus Christ.

Many people think salvation depends on receiving the doctrines of the Bible, but we may receive every doctrine

in this Book and not be a Christian. Views about Christ do not make us Christians; we must come to him as a

person; ―embracing Him, His doctrines, and His spirit. “Now when they saw the boldness of Peter and John

and perceived that they were unlearned and ignorant men, they marveled; and they took knowledge of them,

that they had been with Jesus” (Act 4:13). Jesus said, “Come unto Me.”

In 2 Corinthians 6:17, we have another “come” from the lips of God with Paul’s writing. “Come out

from among them and be ye separate.” Some people think that should be the first “come” ―that coming out and

being separate makes them Christians. Being made new creatures by Christ Jesus, His people can say … I do

not come out to make myself a Christian, but because I am a Christian, I come out!

After an unsuccessful night of fishing and catching nothing, John 21:11 records Jesus as being on the

seashore cooking fish on a fire and calling out to the tired and hungry disciples, “Come and dine.” I’ve always

marveled that the professional fishers had caught nothing, but Jesus, who was not a fisherman, had fish roasting

on the fire. Where did He get the fish?

God satisfies us as soon as we cease to let the world satisfy us. There are three sweet words of the Savior

to Peter in John 21 … “Come and dine;” “Feed My sheep;” and “Follow thou Me.” God never sends a hungry

Christian to feed His sheep; they must themselves first be fed. If we dine with the Master, we can go and satisfy

someone else. In the strength therein, we shall follow Him.

We must not neglect the powerful scene depicting Jesus standing outside the grave of Lazarus, calling

out, “Lazarus, come forth!” Jesus has but to speak the word, and the dead will live. “Ah, but that was Jesus!”

you say. But Jesus says, “Greater things than these shall ye do.”

Another sweet “come” is very important to us. “Come ye yourselves apart into a desert place and rest

awhile.” The disciples had received power to cast out devils; they had come back and told Jesus of the sermons

they had preached and the mighty deeds they had done, expecting Him, perhaps, to pat them on the back and

say, “Ye did well.” There is something we need just as much, and that is to be with Christ. Notice: Christ did

not say, “Go into a desert place.” He never sends us into the desert; He takes us there. A desert is a lovely place

when the Master is with us.

Finally, Jesus said in John 14:3, “I will come again, and receive you unto Myself.” Christ said He would

go away, and He did. He has promised to come back, and He will. Then His word will be, “Come home.”

Francis Mason

Pastor Mason